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The third day: the HBO mystery with Jude Law and Naomie Harris

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The first episode of the miniseries co-produced by HBO and Sky, The third day, presents an apparently very sad and maddened man who finds himself, in spite of himself, on a small island off the English coast. A revealing episode, in a way, about the show’s priorities: hitting the gas more about the mystery than the plot. The vibe of the series is very cryptic, full of saturated colors and quaint cabins that would give anyone a good weekend if it weren’t for the inhospitable, a bit strange, and a bit creepy residents. Yet despite the show’s lurid setting, the story’s circular nature prevents an appreciable amount of tension from building up during the first five episodes, only to escalate in the last.

The pilot says a lot to the viewer even before presenting the island. Sam (Jude Law) he is a man like many others: husband, father, worker. Already in the first bars he reveals his moods: first getting angry and screaming, while talking on the phone about a money robbery in the office, and then showing a huge and initially inexplicable sadness, as he collapses on the bank of a stream. However, he recovers from his crying spell upon seeing a young woman, Epona (Jessie Ross), hanging from a tree in the woods. He snaps, navigates the debris, saves her life, and brings her home, while the teenager mutters, “They’re going to kill me.”

Epona lives in a separate island community, called Hosea, which is only accessible for a short period of time each day, when low tide uncovers a road from Roman times. Once there, Sam is filled with mixed feelings. The first is that the place is somewhat familiar, although as far as I know, his only connection to Hosea is that his grandfather was stationed there during World War II; the second is the same that viewers more accustomed to horror films tend to have, that is, that the inhabitants of remote places know how to be bizarre, disturbing and hide secrets.

The folklore of Hosea

Sam feels there is something is wrong with that remote place, with its almost pagan traditions and the distrust of its people alternating with excessive cordiality towards strangers, but one way or another always manages to miss its opportunities to return to the mainland.

Relying heavily on movies like Ari Aster’s Summer Solstice me Robin Hardy’s Wicker Man, The third day He tries hard not to reveal too many plot details in the first few episodes (there are 6 in total), trying to attract viewers little by little. He then uses Sam’s suspicious behavior and the cliché of blurring the lines between reality and fantasy to make it somehow difficult to understand what is really happening to the protagonist.

Supporting characters help expand engagement and they begin to confuse an already worried Sam: among them the Martins (Paddy Considine and Emily Watson) deserve mention, misfit husbands who run Hosea’s only pub and go from suspect to trustworthy in an instant.

Then there is Jess (Katherine Waterston), an American researcher who studies both ancient (Celtic bacchanal, sacrifices and the like) and recent (a Burning Man-like party designed to stimulate tourism) traditions of the island: she is a fascinating and mysterious woman, with secrets that come very close to the Sam’s dark past.

Like the movies, it seems to emulate The third day owes much of its success to its ability to keep the curtain down till the final reveal. The show (here’s the trailer for The Third Day), however, is a slow burn, in fact spending too much time puzzling Sam as he tries to separate reality from imagination.

To further slow down the pace is the structure of The third day: the first three episodes (collected in the “Summer” section) are separated by a second series of three (“Winter”), in which another strange (Naomie Harris) ends up trapped in Hosea – there is a connection episode involved (“Fall”).

La transmedialità di The third day

Here we need to open a parenthesis. HBO production was born as a transmedia experiment, which invites anyone who sees it to collect all the pieces of the puzzle to piece together the whole story and unravel its mysteries: Fall, as opposed to summer and winter, was a 12-hour event streamed live on Facebook (The third day is the first series with live events).

Unfortunately, in all likelihood, it will never air on Sky due to obvious logistical reasons, but this makes sense when you think about the transmedia of The third day. If you want, being unable to watch Autumn on TV is part of the game. In any case, the event only serves to delve into certain dynamics and better explore some aspects, but it is not essential to enjoy the show and follow the plot.

If there is one thing one can complain about the television series it is the impression of be in front of something already seen. An impression that, however, fades after the first two episodes. Of course, the first episodes are slow and a bit messy, the fault of a series of abused elements in the horror genre: the isolated town, the seemingly harmless but crazy inhabitants, the inevitable party; but the third episode somehow gets the plot off the ground and the second part, that of an excellent Naomie Harris, is a series of twists and turns.

Beyond the mystery

The HBO series works best when it prepares viewers to reveal the secrets of Hosea and his wary inhabitants rather than when it is time to uncover the letters. There’s a lot of drama inside The third dayThe characters have had difficult pasts, lost loved ones, or struggled to prevent this from happening, and their pain is reflected in many of the key scenes. In one of the most iconic lines in the series, Sam tries to explain sadness as a burden to carry alone: ​​”Pain doesn’t work like that, you can’t share it … agony is personal.”

Though Hosea is dotted with eerie posters and murals, which should serve as a warning to characters like Sam to keep them away from the scene, as the episodes progress, the series comes into focus. less on elements of terror and more on everyday and human conflicts that threaten to destroy the island. Viewers may be drawn to see The third day all the way to find out what Hosea’s deepest and darkest secrets are, but it’s the show’s human drama, hidden beneath its mysterious surface, that impacts more than any other aspect.

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Future State Superman: Worlds of War, the Man of Steel is subjected to crazy torture

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In the shocking Future State event timeline, planet Earth faces the great absence of the Man of Steel. In his absence, the last remaining heroes are fighting the mighty of the forces, unaware that they actually Superman is captive by a cosmic god from the DC Comics universe.

In the second volume of Future State Superman: Worlds of War, written by Phillip Kennedy Johnson, readers discover that Mongul has the Kryptonian in chains. Man of steel was relegated to Warworld, forced to fight in the gladiator pit and at the same time defend the lives of his fellow prisoners.

Despite being visibly weakened From a mysterious Mongul trick, Superman continues to abide by his code of ethics, refusing to kill opponents and please the crowd. Whenever Superman is seriously injured in combat, the insane antagonist uses his science cameras to revive him, forcing him into an endless vicious cycle.

Mongul is convinced that by doing so Kal-El will abandon its principles, transforming him into his herald ready to lay waste to Earth. Although the Man of Steel still hopes to stop the tyrant and stop the torment he is subjected to, Mongul currently appears to be close to victory. Let’s find out what happened to the man of tomorrow in Future State Superman. The legacy of the noble house El at the center of a particular Superman story.

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Boruto sets the stage for the evolution of the Otsutsuki Clan

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Alien beings have been the great evils of the Shinobi world since Naruto: Shippuden and the Fourth Great Shinobi War, and their threat has only grown in Boruto: Naruto Next Generations. The new bow of the sleeve saw one of the most powerful Otsutsuki (Kaguya’s partner Isshiki) finally reveal himself.

With Isshiki came many great revelations about the true origin and nature of Otsutsuki, as well as his methods of achieving immortality. Isshiki has been defeated in the last Chapter 55 of the manga and later a plan to create a new generation of Otsutsuki is revealed.

Warning! Boruto 55 manga spoilers

In the new chapter 55, Boruto, Naruto, Sasuke and Kawaki are left reeling after the hard fight with Isshiki and the spirit of Momoshiki Otsutuski, who can possess Boruto through his Karma seal. Naruto has lost Kurama forever and Sasuke’s Rinnegan has been destroyed.

Photo: Shonen Jump Weekly – Boruto 55

Konoha is vulnerable like never before. Meanwhile, the essence of Isshiki has not disappeared from the world as everyone thinks. The villain Otsutsuki left a faulty stamp of White karma in one of his agents named Kara Code.

The code is not viable for Isshiki to resurrect, but it is enough for him to transfer his “will” and power to Code, before his soul dies. Isshiki also leaves the boy with some clear instructions: capture Boruto or Kawaki, and feed the boy. Ten tails with their DNA spotted with Otsutsuki.

Isshiki promises that with enough planets conquered and life eaten away, Code will become a god. Boruto: Naruto Next Generations releases new free manga chapters online monthly. The anime airs Funimation Y Crunchyroll.

Get the latest details from the anime world. Follow us on Google News and stay informed. Kill ne!

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Shaman King: confirmation of Motoko Kumai when Joco arrives

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The official website for the animated adaptation of Hiroyuki Takei’s manga, Shaman king, revealed that Motoso Kumai will return to anime as Coco (Chocolove) McDonell, an American shaman who aspires to become the world’s number one comedian.

Other cast members have also been announced.:

  • Yōko Hikasa (Yoh Asakura)
  • Katsuyuki Konishi (Amidamaru)
  • Megumi Hayashibara (Anna Kyōyama)
  • Inuko Inuyama (Oyamada Blanket)
  • Romi Park (Tao Ren)
  • Kousuke Takaguchi (Bason)
  • Masahiko Tanaka (Ryunosuke Umemiya)
  • Wataru Takagi (Tokagerō)
  • Yuji Ueda (Horohoro)
  • Megumi Nakajima (Kororo)
  • Michiko Neya (Tao Jun)
  • Sakurai Tour (Lee Pailong)
  • Nana Mizuki (Tamao Tamamura)
  • Tokumu Miyazono (Ponchi)
  • Noriaki Kanze (Konchi)
  • Takehito Koyasu (Faust VIII)
  • Masakazu Morita (Mosuke)
  • Minami Takayama (Hao Asakura)
  • Rina Hidaka (Pirika)
  • Yoko Soumi (Lyserg Diethel)

Joji furuta (The Seven Deadly Sins: Rebirth of the Commandments, Kingdom of Love by Uta no Prince Sama Maji, Double Decker! Doug and Kirill, ēlDLIVE) will direct the new anime at Bridge (Fairy Tail, the royal guardian). Shoji yonemura (Pokémon franchise, Ola, Listen to me!) will be loaded with the series scripts. Satohiko Sano (Heybot !, Welcome to the Demon School, Iruma-kun, Talentless Nana) will handle the character design of the characters. Yuki hayashi (My Hero Academia, Haikyu !!) will compose the scores, with King Record as music producer. Masafumi Mima will be the audio director.

The anime will air on TV Tokyo and its channels in April., and will adapt all 35 volumes of the new version of the manga, which began publication in Japan on Kodansha on June 17. Shaman King debuted in Shueisha’s Weekly Shonen Jump in 1998. The series was abruptly discontinued in 2004, although the 2009 reissue of the manga revealed the “true ending.”

While the Shaman King trailer makes us dream of new videos and images, is Anna Kyoyama the perfect heroine?

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